Ask yourself, what is it you want to achieve? What do you need to improve to get there? Define one thing that is the key to your success. How do you train that? If you were able to answer these questions, you have now identified the most important training method for you. Do it every day you train. Put everything else to side or in maintenance mode and put all your energy on improving that one quality. 

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Swimming training is notorious for mixing all types of training into a lump, even while everyone acknowledges that putting all your efforts into one thing gives supreme results in comparison with trying to do multiple things at once. For most athletes there is no optimal ratio of aerobic/lactate/alactic/strength/flexibility/running/etc. to reach their goal, but rather they should focus almost all their efforts on the defined quality that will improve their performance. Unless you are in the top 5% of swimmers in the world, there is very little need for complicated planning and keeping the training as simple and concentrated as possible works better, and even better you might be able to define whether it worked. If you train using a 16 week classical periodization model of 4 weeks base endurance, 4 weeks maxVo2, 4 weeks speed and 4 weeks competition, with complicated meso- and micro cycles mixed in, how in earth you can define what you need to change for next season to reach better results? Many have tried (including me), but I am yet to hear convincing logic.

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Start by simplifying your plan to the bare minimum and start building an inventory of things you have experienced (and quantified) working. Then by all means add something new into it and see the results. Through the process, you start seeing patterns and even if they go against your education and believe system keep doing what works. One can argue with results, but it is pointless. If you get the results you desire, it works!